“The Oakland Raiders lose another NFL Hall of Fame Worthy Icon From the Past in Dave Grayson”

 

Dave Grayson Nemiah Wilson willie Brown Dave Grayson George Atkinson
Oakland Defensive Backs Nemiah Wilson, Willie Brown, Dave Grayson & George Atkinson

The Oakland Raiders lost another link to their storied past when AFL historian Todd Tobias announced on Twitter that Raider great defensive back Dave Grayson had passed away at the age of 78.  No cause of death was given at this time.

Dave played for Oakland between 1965-1970.  He played for the Dallas Texans/Chiefs before that, and was originally drafted by the Dallas Cowboys.  Grayson was an undrafted free agent out of the University of Oregon.

dave graysonryreyr

Al Davis Traded for CB Dave Grayson in 1965 (he traded him for future actor Fred “The Hammer” Williamson) from the Chiefs and then traded for Willie Brown from Denver in 1967.  This allowed the Raiders to play the physical bump and run style that has been a trademark of the team for years.

When NFL and former Cowboys personnel guru Gil Brandt was asked who were the 4 best cornerbacks in Dallas history his first 3 were not a shock.  Mel Renfro, Herb Adderly & Deion Sanders.  “I also include Dave Grayson.  He didn’t play with the Cowboys but he’s so good I’m including him.”

Dave Grayson went undrafted because at 5’ 10” and 185 pounds, he was dubbed too small by many NFL experts including Cowboys coach Tom Landry after the Cowboys briefly signed him and then let him go.  Gil Brandt liked him a lot and told the upstart AFL team the Dallas Texans (eventually the Kansas City Chiefs) to give him a shot.  Grayson was a key cog in the KC return game and at defensive back.  Grayson was fast and a ball hawk, something the Chiefs coaches loved.

dave grayson jim tyrer earl faison bud mcfadin ladd
Dave Grayson hamming it up with AFL All Stars Jim Tyrer, Earl Faison, Bud McFadin & Future Iconic Pro Wrestler Ernie “The Big Cat” Ladd

Grayson held the AFL record for the longest interception return for a touchdown at 99 yards against the New York Titans in 1961.  Dave made many other key plays for the Chiefs including his famous interception off of Houston QB George Blanda in the Texans epic double overtime win in the 1962 AFL Championship game.

For the Raiders he was a great player both in the regular season and in the post season.  He ended up with 48 total interceptions with an amazing 933 return yards after his interceptions.  His best year was in 1968 where he had 10 interceptions and 1 fumble recovery.  He was also a quality top 10 kick return man as well.

Other career highlights:

-48 career interceptions with an amazing 19.4 yard return average

-25.4 kick off return average

-6 time AFL all-star

-4 time First team All Pro

-2 time AFL Champion

-Voted on the AFL all time team

-Career interception leader in the AFL

The Greatest Defense Nobody Knows About:

Dave was a part of the amazing Oakland defense called the 11 angry men.  This defense is one of the greatest of all time that never gets their due.

In the amazing 1967 season, the Raiders had an astounding 67 sacks & 30 interceptions.  Teams averaged 3 turnovers a game against the Raiders.  This was also only in a 14 game season.  The record for sacks is held by the 1984 Chicago Bears at 72, and with almost a 5 sacks per game average, it’s pretty safe to say that the Raiders would have eclipsed that record fairly easily in 16 games.

raiders defense 11 angry men
Houston trying to come back from 3 touchdowns behind against the Oakland Raiders “11 Angry Men” in the 1967 AFL Championship Game

Even with only 14 games, the Raiders STILL hold the record for causing the most yards lost while an opponent passes.  This record is now 50 years old.

Another record that stands is that the Raiders lead the league in sacks for 3 straight years.  Another 5 decade old record.  Oakland also has the all time record for leading the league in sacks at 5.  That’s how great they were. The offense always gets the publicity but even in their Super Bowl wins and in the 1960’s, getting pressure on the QB was paramount to the Raiders success.  Offense puts butts in the seats and gets all of the publicity, but defense wins championships.

(Below are the all time stats for sacks by a team; many records are held by the Oakland Raiders)

http://www.nfl.com/history/randf/records/def/sacks

Amazing Names:

With the likes of Ken Davidson and Tom Keating leading the way the Raiders had a huge and ferocious defense.  The names of the past are a who’s who of Raider lore.  Two more underrated DB’s in Rodger Bird, Kent McCloughan and Warren Powers were teamed up with Howie Williams, Dave Grayson and Willie Brown.

Dan Conners played MLB while Bill Laskey & Gus Otto shored the outside positions.  Dan Birdwell and Ike Lassiter, Carleton Oats and Art Thoms; so many proud names of the past that helped the Raiders to unreal records in the 1960’s.  From 1967-69 the Raiders were a ridiculous 37-4-1, the best record in football.

dave grayson 2

Hall of Fame:

I’ve written at length about the biases of the NFL Hall of Fame and why some are not in the hall.  There are many that should be in the hall of fame (i.e. Cliff Branch) and I’ve written about them below.  I’m glad that more people are agreeing with me.

https://jimjax4.wordpress.com/2016/02/10/oakland-raiders-defensive-players-who-shouldshouldnt-be-in-the-nfl-hall-of-fame/

https://jimjax4.wordpress.com/2016/02/09/what-oakland-raiders-players-are-next-into-the-hof-whos-in-whos-not/

One of the great biases with NFL historians, is their turning their noses up at the AFL saying how it was no where near as good as the NFL.  In the beginning days I totally agree.  As time went on though, that myth was changed when the Jets beat the heavily favored Colts in Super Bowl 3.  More than a few people feel the Raiders and the Chiefs of the 1960’s had more talent and speed than the aging Green Bay Packers but they were overwhelmed in the Super Bowls against a mythical team with the greatest football coach of all time and an aura and mental toughness and a refusal to make mistakes.

dave grayson chiefs

It’s a shame that only 3 all time AFL defensive players are in the NFL HOF.  There are others that deserve it and I think Dave Grayson is one of them.  With his speed and ball hawking skills, he made big plays at big times and he’s never received the credit he deserved, much like the great Raider defenses of the day.

I hope that others will join me in giving appreciation for this great Chief and Raider player.  Another forgotten icon of the AFL and NFL who should never be forgotten.

dave grayson raiders

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3 thoughts on ““The Oakland Raiders lose another NFL Hall of Fame Worthy Icon From the Past in Dave Grayson””

  1. Agree with you on the bias, but I see the greater bias based of the ignorance of the younger people who are nominating, against players from the ’60s and ’70s in general. I was shocked when Billy Shaw got in. A better case for AFL bias can be made by Johnny Robinson not getting in the HOF. Dave Grayson was good, but he was nowhere near as good as Robinson (’60s) or Cliff Harris and Jake Scott (’70s) and they’re not in the HOF. Look how long it took Paul Krause and Roger Wehrli to get in to the HOF…Ridiculous. Speaking of ridiculous how did Dave Robinson get in before Maxie Baughan and Chuck Howley? How can you expect Branch to be in hall, when Harold Jackson and Drew Pearson aren’t in?

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    1. thanks for your opinion Jack. I appreciate it. I’ll take Branch over Pearson and Jackson. In the 70’s in their heyday the AFC was much better than the NFC dominating in the post season/Super Bowl. There are many people that should be in the hall of fame and the younger voters havent been voting for years to keep people like ken stabler out so blaming them in my opinion is wrong. again, we will agree to disagree.

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      1. I have five colleagues who I work closely with, all sportswriters, 3 of whom have been or are on the nominating committee. The noticed bias of the younger writers, I got that firsthand from them. You’re really disagreeing with them, I just trusted their observation. Their accusation is either true or not true, it’s not an opinion statement. Younger sportswriters just don’t know enough about the players from the time we’re discussing, it’s natural to expect them to face difficulty grading players they never saw and trust me, they don’t study film of senior candidates, they look at numbers. Paul Zimmerman was very vocal about this, especially the arbitrary cutoff time of what constitutes a “senior player” or “old-timer” vs. a modern player. I think it’s been redefined as a player whose career has been over for 25 years, there used to be an arbitrary cutoff date. For example, I can tell you all about how great Largent, Rice, Biletnikoff, Alworth, Warfield, Taylor were…but can I really tell you how great Hutson was? Zimmerman watched film and wrote about him and my dear departed friend Bob Carroll told me how great he was. I trust them. Ken Stabler was marginal and of course I expect you to disagree, meanwhile Ken Anderson fans can make a strong case that he’s more deserving. I understand you’re a Raiders fan and expect nothing less than for you to say things like Branch had a better career than Harold Jackson or Drew Pearson. This falls in the category of opinion. The bias is more likely to be factual not, based on the information I have, which is first-hand testimony.

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